Posts Tagged Travel photography

Southern Charm in New Orleans, Louisiana

We’d been hearing a lot about New Orleans, or Nola in short, and what a fun place it is especially during Mardi Gras season.  Although we came in Thanksgiving instead of Mardi Gras, we could still feel a lot of the vibrant energy that makes Nola one of the most exciting cities in the south.

Nola’s history is to thank for its charm – being once a French territory then coming into Spanish control, and then back to France before being bought by the United States.  The European touch can still be strongly felt with the abundance of European architecture and streets.  From houses with beautiful verandas and streets with their earlier Spanish names on placards, and the oldest section of the city being one of the busiest too – the French Quarter.  But nonetheless, Americans and Africans have done a great job integrating their culture with the history of the old city, with the inclusion of jazz, arts, and food.

One of the things I loved the most from the trip was undoubtedly the delicious Creole cuisine.  The city’s history of being a melting pot of French, African and American cultures have concocted delicious dishes like gumbo, jambalaya, po’ boys, shrimp creole, and my favorite – crawfish pie.  

 

Autumn in Annecy

Friends have told me that this alpine region in the mountains of France was a lovely place to visit, and I have been very fortunate to have the chance to see it for myself.  Though unplanned, my visit brought me here at the best time of the year – autumn.  As the leaves turned golden and red, the whole town held onto what was left of the solstice, before the colder winds crawled in.  It was lovely! 

Off the Beaten Path: Vietnam

Naturally beautiful, exotic, and utterly captivating… Vietnam is one of those countries where you can expect to receive true Southeast Asian hospitality.  A humble country that’s been torn several times in different wars and now a communist nation, its people are naturally kind, with a happy semblance that bears no grudge or regret, only contentment and peace. On my journey I had traveled between Hanoi, Ha Long Bay, and Mai Chau… and what I saw made me fall in love with the country’s rural beauty.

Up and Down the Streets of Porto

Port wine may be famous all over the world, but it isn’t the only thing that makes Porto interesting.  Porto happens to be the second largest city in Portugal after Lisbon, and the city is one of the oldest European centers, so it comes as no surprise that Unesco has claimed it as a world heritage site since 1996.

What I saw in the streets proved more than enough reason to have the city preserved.  The Airbnb we stayed in, for example, was a beautiful 19th century home, with 15-foot high ceilings and verandas that welcomed a cool breeze in between spring and summer.  All the houses on the street had similar facades, and they intrigued me about the history and what it must have been like to live in this street more than a hundred years ago.

Images from the Slot Canyons

Last week I had posted a short video from my unexpected trip through Canyon X.  During the same journey and prior to Canyon X, I had visited the lower Antelope Canyon in Page, Arizona, and captured the images you’ll see below of the stunning rock formations which have become what they are today through billions of years of transformation.

To give you an idea, there are two types of slot canyons in Page – the lower and the upper canyons.  What makes them different is that the upper is on the ground or upper level, while the lower canyons are under ground level. By definition, slot canyons are narrow canyons formed by the wear of water rushing through rocks over time.  And they are significantly deeper than they are wide.  In some canyons the drop could be more than 30 meters (100 ft or similar to a 10-storey building) to the floor of the canyon.

Although they are very beautiful, it’s always important to check flash flood warnings prior to hiking.  If it rains in any surrounding area, the probability of water from anywhere upstream flowing down to the canyons can be very dangerous, and in most slot canyons, it could be miles before you find the nearest exit.  In the image below, you will see behind the girl and before the slopes are interesting patterns on the ground.  These are the surface areas of the lower canyons. The gaps on the surface let light come through, and you will see in the photos that follow what they look like when you’re inside the canyons.